Have you connected with your inner child lately? If ever? 

Taking some time to remember who you were as a child can bring back memories of carefree days before the responsibilities of adulthood came along. Or, if you experienced neglect, trauma, or other emotional pain early in life, your inner child will be in need of some nurturing.

Reflecting on these early memories and vast life experiences (the good, and the bad) and giving your younger self support now, that you should have had then can be really powerful. You might uncover some interesting insights and old childhood beliefs that could be interfering with your daily life and relationships now. 

Image of a small child and a woman opening a gift together.

Old pain from being hurt as a child resurfaces and shows up well into adulthood. This can feel like confusion, pain, as well as distress in personal relationships, separation anxiety, fear of your partner leaving you, or having a hard time meeting your own needs. These scars can continue to influence your reactions, expectations, and connection with the present world.

Communicating with, and nurturing your inner child can help to overcome some of these issues. 

So, how do you know if you need to nurture your inner child? If you feel like there was something that you needed when you were little and you didn’t get it, then this practice would work well for you. 

In a safe place close your eyes and think of a moment in time when you needed something, like a hug, or reassurance from someone that everything was going to be okay. Usually, the first memory that pops into your mind will be the right one to concentrate on.

Image of a child standing outside looking at a map.

Imagine yourself walking into the space and giving little you, exactly what you needed.

You can hold her, assure her that it’s not her fault, tell her you love her and that everything is going to be okay. 

Use your intuition to guide your words or actions, and be sure to use a supportive, soft, nurturing, and patient voice with your younger self. You are an adult now, so you can be the authoritative figure that may have been missing back in your childhood to step in and deliver the important messages. 

Assure them that they haven’t done anything wrong, in fact, they did the best they could at the time of the trauma. It’s likely that they (you) buried their pain deep inside as a protective mechanism to keep them safe. 

Image of a smiling boy running under a water sprinkler.

Nurturing your inner child requires you to tune in, feel the feelings, and uncover some uncomfortable and difficult truths. The only way is through, and it can be a very emotional journey of self-reflection. But on the other side of vulnerability is freedom in your adult life. If you keep those doors closed because they’re too painful to enter, you will only delay your healing. 

You need to get that message to your inner child so that she/he can move forward, and as a result, your current self can also move forward. You both deserve to feel free, worthy, loved, and cared for.

Your inner child had a lot to do with the person you are today, so thank them. Regularly keep in touch with them and ask them what they need—which is, to be cared for by someone who wants the very best for them— and that’s you!

Delving into your childhood memories can be a lot easier with the help of a Counsellor, so please reach out if you would like to book a session and I can walk you through it.